My Great Grandfather Left his Mark….Claybrooke Parva, Leicestershire

8 Jun
Mark of John Perkins

Stable block in Claybrooke Parva, Leicestershire showing my Great Grandfather’s handiwork.

I shall pass this way but once; any good that I can do or any kindness I can show to any human being; let me do it now. Let me not defer nor neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again.

Etienne de Grellet
Quaker Missionary

This was an Email I sent to John Althouse, Editor of the Clandigger:

Just reading the May Clandigger published by the Edmonton Branch of the Alberta Genealogy Society and the article about the BRICK in the Wall. It reminded me of an email I had received some time ago from someone from my ancestral village…Claybrooke Magna/Parva in Leiecestershire, England. I had posted an enquiry on the Leicestershire Village Website re the Perkins Family.

Nicholas Jenkins references his stableblock (see picture 1891 ) with the name of my great grandfather…John Perkins.

Thought this might be an interesting follow up to your article. Didn’t know the format you required so I sent the entire email with pictures so you could judge for yourself.  Louise

Email from Nicholas Jenkins:

“Paul Smith, who is my neighbour, passed a copy of your email to me. 

I can’t tell from your email where you are located. From your note it would appear that you might be abroad. If so, are you in Canada? You will see why I ask the question later in my message.  I & my family have lived in Claybrooke Parva since November 1979. There was a chap who lived in Magna named Tom Perkins & I suspect he was the chap who Paul Smith spoke to. He was much involved with village life & I believe served for many years on the Claybrooke Magna Parish Council. He moved to Lutterworth in his latter years where, I presume he died. 

My home has a stable block that was erected in 1891 and the ironwork was made by J Perkins of Claybrooke Magna – see attached photo & note that the village had no ‘e’ on end. The number 1 under the crown indicates the quality of the iron as there were different qualities used for things like hinges to pots & pans etc. 1 is the lowest quality. I have a sheet on this somewhere but can’t find it. It would seem that this would have been John Perkins – see attached document. I have not studied the family tree but your photo would seem to be early 20th Century. This would make me think that the John Thomas shown would probably be son of the John who died in 1896. The Tom Perkins I knew – but only in passing – did tell me a bit of history when I showed him our stable block iron work.

 The info from Kelly’s Directory 1891 for the Claybrookes might be of interestKelly Directory p2

Tom Perkins told me that he was named after his uncle, the Claybrooke Magna Blacksmith. His uncle emigrated to Canada after WW1 (early to mid 1920s??) to make a better life for himself & family. Would our Tom have been named after John Thomas? Is John Thomas the man who emigrated & Tertius (3rd son?) would have gone too? Hence I ask if you are in Canada. Tom did tell me that the Perkins smithy also made most of the ironwork in the cemetery & around the churchyard. Sadly a lot of that was used for military purposes in WW2.

Note: My Grandparents and my dad, then 9 years old, emigrated to Canada in 1913. Don’t know who Tom was named after…perhaps it was his uncle John Thomas. 

 

Obituary for John Perkins…Village Blacksmith.  1896

out-13

 

That’s about all I have. If you’ve contacted the Benfords then I would have thought they’d know something more on Perkins. The buildings you have in your 2011 photo are for sale at a very high asking price & planning permission for 4 homes. The agents are Wells McFarlane see attached.”  Regards..

The Village Smithy around late 1890’s and Main Street in Claybrooke  Magna

John Thomas Perkins Blacksmith

Claybrooke Magna

Main Street Claybrooke Magna as it looks today. Property was up for sale on my last visit. 

 

 

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